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Gary McDougal

Gary is a retired police officer who served with the Calgary Police Service for 25 years; the last 8 years of his career, Gary was a member of the Hostage/Barricaded Negotiation Team. He served as both a Team Leader and Training coordinator for the Calgary Hostage Negotiation team and was a frequent presenter at the Canadian Police College and upon retiring in 2006, Gary formed a company called Conflict Solutions. He is currently on the speaking circuit, delivering training in a number of disciplines which include effective negotiation skills, conflict management, dealing with difficult clients, ethics in the workplace and workplace violence issues. Gary is a graduate of the Negotiation Certification program at the University of Calgary as well as a graduate of the FBI Hostage Negotiators Training School and has also served as an Instructor at the FBI Training Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

Presentation Description & Topics

Gary is a retired police officer who served with the Calgary Police Service for 25 years; the last 8 years
of his career, Gary was a member of the Hostage/Barricaded Negotiation Team.
He served as both a Team Leader and Training coordinator for the Calgary Hostage Negotiation team
and was a frequent presenter at the Canadian Police College and upon retiring in 2006, Gary formed a
company called Conflict Solutions. He is currently on the speaking circuit, delivering training in a
number of disciplines which include effective negotiation skills, conflict management, dealing with
difficult clients, ethics in the workplace and workplace violence issues.

Gary is a graduate of the Negotiation Certification program at the University of Calgary as well as a
graduate of the FBI Hostage Negotiators Training School and has also served as an Instructor at the FBI
Training Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

 

DEALNG WITH DIFFICULT PEOPLE / CONSTRUCTIVE CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
Duration Options: Any length from a 30 minute keynote to a full day workshop.
This presentation includes:
A discussion relating to how our individual perceptions, assumptions and mindset affect our
thoughts, behaviours and attitudes and ultimately the outcome of our personal interactions.
A presentation and discussion around the need for professionalism, strategies for managing our
own anger during difficult interactions and strategies for managing strong emotions in those
difficult people we interact with.
A specific focus on the skill of defusing angry people and dealing with verbally aggressive
subjects. In addition, we will explore the theory of “response expectation” and the
“emotion/reason equilibrium”. This provides some understanding of why people act as they do in
conflict.
A last resort strategy to use when dealing with difficult clients, when all other means of
resolution have been unsuccessful.

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE; PREDICTION AND PREVENTION
Duration: Any length from a 30 minute keynote to a 4 hour session.
This presentation includes:
An examination of factors that contribute to violence in the workplace.
An exploration of the evolution of violence; it follows a pattern of escalation which creates a
need for employers and co-workers to recognize these indicators of escalation. This includes an
examination of how, in many cases, the offender specifically selects a victim and how in far
fewer cases, the violence is random.
An interactive discussion of offender rationalization and motivation as, in most cases, the violent
person truly believes the violence is the “right thing to do”. At times, the violent person is driven
by religion, other times factors such as revenge, psychosis, misguided romance and other time by
perceived “honour”.
Identification of sources of potential violence, including risk from strangers, customers, co-
workers and former co-workers and threats from domestic related sources.
A discussion relating to how, in many cases, violent people are purposeful in their actions; dates,
methods and locations are significant and often drive the violent actions. We will also explore the
similarity in patterns between suicidal subjects and homicidal subjects.

CONFLICT SOLUTIONS

A discussion of strategies to employ in the unlikely event a violent incident occurs in your workplace. This includes how to pre-plan your personal emergency responses and how to mentally prepare yourself.

This presentation includes a review and discussion of on 4 universal principles relating to violent behaviour which are: The violent subject often rationalizes and feels justified in carrying out their violent actions.
The violent subject often mimics or imitates the actions of other violent people.
The violent person often acts in a purposeful manner.
The violent subject often exhibits warning signs that precede the violent act(s).

WORKPLACE BULLYING
Duration: Maximum 1 hour presentation.
This presentation includes:
An examination of what workplace bullying looks like; what specific behaviours are associated
with this type of activity.
A review of the typical profile of the workplace bully; their methods of operation, their tactics
and strategies for detection avoidance.
An examination of the process the bully uses for victim/target selection. What characteristics
draw the workplace bully to the victim or target.
A close up look at what strategies we can use to confront the workplace bully and a discussion of
why, in many cases, we choose not to confront the bully.
An examination and interactive discussion of what impact the actions of the bully have on the
victim or target. As we know, there are serious implications for those targeted by the workplace
bully, and in this segment, we look at what price the target is forced to pay.
Finally, a detailed strategy of what a person can do when they are the target or victim of the
workplace bully. We will outline specific steps to take that will force the bully to account for
his/her actions and ultimately address the behaviour.

SUICIDE INTERVENTION / UNDERSTANDING SUICIDE
Duration: From a 60 minute keynote to an 8 hour workshop.
This presentation includes:
A review of the various factors that often drive people toward suicidal behaviour. This will
include a discussion regarding the phenomenon surrounding “patterns of suicide” which accounts
for how sometimes people suicide in “clusters”.

An exploration of the concept of “constriction” relating to how suicidal people often experience a
very narrowed view of personal options and accounts for why suicide often appears to be an
attractive option for people in that situation.
The presentation will include a differentiation between a genuine suicidal attempt and a suicidal
gesture. In addition, we will explore the various and widely held myths surrounding suicide.
Participants will be provided with an understanding of the direct and indirect behaviors and cues,
both verbal and non-verbal, that suicidal people often display. This will include specific
strategies people can employ when they find themselves engaged in an unexpected conversation
with a suicidal person.

SOCIAL INFLUENCE: GETTING PEOPLE TO DO WHAT YOU WANT
Duration: Maximum 1 hour presentation.

This presentation includes:
Based on the book “Influence” written by Robert Cialdini, there are a number of social patterns
that enable us to predict, with some certainty, how others will react in certain situations. In his
section, we will explore how these concepts can be used during interpersonal interactions to
influence positive outcome.
Reciprocity: When people are given something or treated in a certain way, they often feel driven
to respond in a similar or parallel manner.
Commitment: In our society, once people make a commitment, often they are reluctant to
back out of a commitment made and that concept can be used to influence behaviour in a positive
way.
Social Proof: When people find themselves in positions of uncertainty or ambiguity, often they
look to people around them and then mimic or imitate the behaviours of others. Having an
understanding of this behaviour can assist us in influencing actions of others.
Liking: If we can get people to like us, most often we can have influence over them and this can
be used, not to manipulate, rather to influence the actions of people we deal with.